To check doneness properly, use a digital cooking thermometer. Fresh cut muscle meats such as pork chops, pork roasts, pork loin, and tenderloin should measure 145° F, ensuring the maximum amount of flavor. Ground pork should always be cooked to 160° F.



What type of thermometer do I use for a pork tenderloin?

We highly recommend using a ThermoPro Digital Meat Thermometer to keep an eye on pork’s internal temperature, ensuring a tender and delicious meal out of the oven with no stress or worry.

Where do you put the meat thermometer in a pork tenderloin?

Insert the thermometer into the centre of the thickest part of the meat, away from bone or fat for the most accurate reading. Make sure the thermometer does not pierce all the way through to touch the bottom of the baking pan.

How do you cook a pork loin with a thermometer?

Once you remove your pork loin from the oven, allow it to rest for a few minutes to ensure juices don’t escape once it is pierced by the thermometer. Then, insert the thermometer into the loin at its thickest part, all the way to the meat’s canter.

What is the best temperature to cook pork tenderloin?

The USDA’s recommended pork tenderloin temp is 145 degrees Fahrenheit. However, by cooking your pork tenderloin to an internal temperature 10 to 12 degrees below that temperature and resting it for at least 5 to 6 minutes you will kill all of the harmful pathogens. This cook and hold method is also known as the process of meat pasteurization.

What kind of thermometer should I use to measure pork?

We highly recommend using a ThermoPro Digital Meat Thermometer to keep an eye on pork’s internal temperature, ensuring a tender and delicious meal out of the oven with no stress or worry. Welcome to ThermoPro, our goal is to help you cook like a pro!

What meat can be cooked with a thermometer?

Red meats include beef, pork, lamb, rabbit, and other mammals. To test the temperature of meat properly, you want to insert your thermometer into the thickest section possible, and you want to avoid letting the probe touch bone, fat, or gristle.