Spears are ready to harvest when they are about 6 to 8 inches tall and at least a half-inch thick. If the tip of the spear has started to open and produce foliage, otherwise known as going to seed, you’ve waited too long to pick it. It’s still technically edible, but it will be woody and tough. The Old Farmers Almanac has advice on when that optimum time is for asparagus. Spears are ready to harvest when they are about 6 to 8 inches tall and at least a half-inch thick. If the tip of the spear has started to open and produce foliage, otherwise known as going to seed, you’ve waited too long to pick it.



How can you tell when asparagus is ripe?

Color: Asparagus should be should be rich in green color, softly fading to white at the bottom of the stalk. Avoid those dull in color, as this indicates the asparagus is passed freshness. The tips of asparagus may display dark green or purple highlights.

How do you pick asparagus so it keeps growing?

When the spears appear in spring, harvest them when they are 6 to 10 inches above the soil line, but before the flower buds are open. Simply cut or snap off the spears at ground level. Continue harvesting for six to eight weeks, but no later than July 1.

How do you pick tender asparagus?

Choose Pristine Buds

Stalks should be plump and firm, and tips should be tightly closed. Color can be green, purple, or white, depending on the variety. Make sure the color is not faded. A good grocer will chill asparagus or store it standing upright in cold, fresh water.

When should I cut my asparagus?

Ideally, asparagus should be cut back in the fall but it is important that you wait until all of the foliage has died back and turned brown or yellow. This will normally happen after the first frost, but it can happen without frost in areas that do not receive frost.

When is the best time to eat asparagus?

The crop is harvested around late February until early June, making the prime time to eat it around April and May. This veggie grows as an edible stalk. From sowing the seed to harvesting, it takes three years for asparagus to be ready to eat.

Should you eat raw or cook asparagus?

With the right preparation, you can get the best from raw asparagus. For example, remove the woody ends of the spear, and then using a vegetable grater, shred the spears into fine pieces. The thinner the pieces, the easier they’ll be to chew. Cooking might boast of another advantage.

How long do you cook asparagus?

On a large sheet pan, toss the asparagus with olive oil, and season it with salt and pepper. The spears can be arranged close to each other, but avoid any overlapping. Roast until tender (about 15 minutes). Pro tip from Chef Olivieri: Like any green vegetable, the longer you cook it, the more the color will fade to a dull ugly green.

When to divide and transplant asparagus?

First harvest: In the third year, make your first harvest a light one. Once the plants become more robust in subsequent years, you can harvest more heavily. If you notice a decline in robustness after several years, you may want to divide and transplant your asparagus.